“American Horror Story: Apocalypse” ends our world

In+a+collision+between+%22Murder+House%22+and+%22Coven%2C%22+Ryan+Murphy+and+Brad+Falchuk+create+a+one-of-a-kind+season.
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“American Horror Story: Apocalypse” ends our world

In a collision between

In a collision between "Murder House" and "Coven," Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk create a one-of-a-kind season.

FX

In a collision between "Murder House" and "Coven," Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk create a one-of-a-kind season.

FX

FX

In a collision between "Murder House" and "Coven," Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk create a one-of-a-kind season.

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For many years, I have suffered through season upon season of “American Horror Story.” In a post-“Freak Show” world, good episodes of the anthology series are few and far between. The show’s audience has been shrinking, with diehard fans left disenfranchised and longing for the days of “Murder House.”

Well, long no longer. American Horror Story is back, witches.

The premiere of “American Horror Story: Apocalypse,” entitled “The End,” aired Sept. 12 on FX. This season is a crossover of season one’s “Murder House” and season three’s “Coven,” revolving around the end of the world, and the conditions in which some survivors are now forced to live.

“Apocalypse” stars an ensemble cast of Sarah Paulson as Wilhemina Venable, Cordelia Goode and Billie Dean Howard; Evan Peters as Mr. Gallant and Tate Langdon; Leslie Grossman as Coco St. Pierre Vanderbilt; Billie Lourd as Mallory; Adina Porter as Dinah Stevens; Cody Fern as Michael Langdon; Kathy Bates as Miriam Mead; Joan Collins as Evie Gallant; Timothy Campbell as Kyle Allen; and Ashley Santos as Emily.

The episode opens with panic in a hair salon upon receiving a message that ballistic missiles have been launched. We then follow parts of our cast racing to survival, and finding themselves in an underground safe house with an odd society.

At first, I was hesitant to like this season. As they say, “once bitten, twice shy.” I have been burned one too many times by “American Horror Story,” and I wasn’t going to let it happen again. Especially not when the episode began with a group of millennials acting obnoxiously in a hair salon, only to be disrupted by the apocalypse.

But as the show progressed, I found myself invested. Rioting in the streets? Underground bunkers? Execution-style killings? Cannibalism? The Carpenters? What more could I want (besides Stevie Nicks)?

And a pervasive creepiness? “Apocalypse” has brought back the spine-tingling fear which was so common in earlier seasons. I never know what’s going to come around the next corner, and as an audience member, that’s just how I like my American horror stories.