“Glass” debuts as final installment of “Split” franchise

From+left+to+right%3A+Kevin+Wendell+Crumb%2C+Mr.+Glass+and+David+Dunn+in+official+%22Glass%22+promotional+poster.
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“Glass” debuts as final installment of “Split” franchise

From left to right: Kevin Wendell Crumb, Mr. Glass and David Dunn in official

From left to right: Kevin Wendell Crumb, Mr. Glass and David Dunn in official "Glass" promotional poster.

Universal Pictures

From left to right: Kevin Wendell Crumb, Mr. Glass and David Dunn in official "Glass" promotional poster.

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures

From left to right: Kevin Wendell Crumb, Mr. Glass and David Dunn in official "Glass" promotional poster.

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On Jan. 18, M. Night Shyamalan, writer, producer and director of the psychological thrillers “Split” and “Unbreakable,” released “Glass,” a film which serves as a final installment to the franchise. Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson return as their “Unbreakable” characters and James McAvoy and Anya Taylor-Joy return as their “Split” characters.

 

The film was marketed as a climactic showdown between David Dunn, Elijah Price and Kevin Wendell Crumb.

 

The first act sets up everything rather well, following David Dunn, who since “Unbreakable” has opened a home-security business with his son, while fighting street crime as the alter ego of the Overseer. It also tracks Kevin who has abducted four girls again and is up to the same psychotic shenanigans we saw in “Split.” But the titular character of Elijah Price — a.k.a. Mr. Glass — doesn’t even become a significant player until well over halfway into the film.

 

The film then transitions to the next act, where Dunn, Price and Crumb are locked up in a psychiatric ward, psychoanalyzed by Dr. Ellie Staple, played by Sarah Paulson. Staple specializes in individuals with mental disorders that cause them to believe they are superheroes.

 

“Glass” is more about the dialogue than the action.  It demands that you’ve recently seen its two predecessors to understand it. It tells you it’s going to do one thing, then does another. The movie keeps you on the edge of your seat, consisting of three twist endings.

 

“Where other superhero movies play it safe, “Glass” goes out on a limb. Where other superhero movies undercut their ridiculousness with jokes, “Glass” doubles down on its absurdity. This is a movie that believes in itself,” said Micah Mertes World-Herald from Omaha News.