Jupiter High puts on their annual Mardi Gras

Sophomore+Robert+Miller+and+sophomore+Dainius+Horan+standing+at+their+project+booth+at+Mardi+Gras.
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Jupiter High puts on their annual Mardi Gras

Sophomore Robert Miller and sophomore Dainius Horan standing at their project booth at Mardi Gras.

Sophomore Robert Miller and sophomore Dainius Horan standing at their project booth at Mardi Gras.

Glenda Sidman

Sophomore Robert Miller and sophomore Dainius Horan standing at their project booth at Mardi Gras.

Glenda Sidman

Glenda Sidman

Sophomore Robert Miller and sophomore Dainius Horan standing at their project booth at Mardi Gras.

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On March 5, members of the French National Honor Society presented Jupiter High’s annual Mardi Gras celebration. It was held in the school’s cafeteria and courtyard from 6 to 8 p.m, and students, parents, faculty and staff were invited to attend.

French students had to create a project to display at the event. Each level of the class had to produce a different project. First year had to recreate famous French landmarks, second year created booths based off of a French speaking country, third year made food booths and fourth year was managing the celebration. The projects were judged and awarded prizes at the end of the night.

“We probably worked about four hours. Our project was on Morocco, and we did not place… the winning project was Luxembourg,” sophomore Robert Miller said.

The Jupiter High jazz band played at the event, while guests walked around to see the displays, booths and projects and to eat tasty, French food (crepes, French fries, waffles, croque monsieur, croissants, etc.).

“The Jupiter High jazz band provided the music. There was a great turn out of people, and they all seemed to enjoy the food, music and our projects,” Miller said.

French cuisine was prepared or purchased by the students to go along with the country on which they did their project.

“We either had to buy or make food that was from the country we did our project on,” Miller said.

If a guest wanted to buy either food or something else that was being sold, they had to exchange their American money for euros.